Episode 036 – Daring Greatly; Living Wholeheartedly

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better.  The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena….and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat. –Theodore Roosevelt, from his speech Citizenship in a Republic

(c) Thinkstock

(c) Thinkstock

Play Episode

Play
Subscribe in iTunes | Subscribe in Stitcher | Subscribe via RSS

On This Episode

Tune-up Tip – What Do Aristotelian Logic and Gluten-Free Foods Have in Common?
Random Riffs – The World According to My Head
Feature Segment – Daring Greatly: Living Wholeheartedly

Tune-Up Tip – Aristotelian Logic and Gluten-Free Bread

Gluten-free products are all the rage these days. Eating a gluten-free diet is necessary for those with Celiac disease or a gluten intolerance.  However, many make the assumption that gluten-free products are healthy (or healthier), but this is not necessarily true.  If we apply a logical proof test, we’d come to the conclusion that, for people with an intolerance, foods with gluten are harmful, and foods without gluten are not harmful.  But the absence of gluten does not mean it is healthy.  It only means it won’t harm you.

Eating mindfully means being truthful about what you are doing. Don’t use bad logic to trick yourself into believing gluten-free = healthy.

Random Riffs – The World According to My Head

Do you ever catch your mind wandering? Not just meandering, but taking giant leaps from thought to thought, making often illogical connections.

Do you do it too? Is it a sign of creativity, genius, or just plain nuts?

Let me know your thoughts.

Feature Segment – Daring Greatly; Living Wholeheartedly

“…the credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena.… who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.

Dr. Brene Brown begins her book, Daring Greatly, with this passionate quote by Theodore Roosevelt, as a definition of vulnerability.  Vulnerability, according to Brown, is understanding the necessity of both victory and defeat.  Of having the courage to be all in.

In Episode 034, we talked about some of the hidden barriers to making a big leap to success, creativity, and love. We learned that one of those barriers is feeling fundamentally flawed.

Dr. Brene Brown’s book delves deeper into this idea. She has spent 12 years studying shame, empathy, and being “enough”.  In Daring Greatly, she tells us we must walk into the arena and, rather than sitting on the sidelines, we must let ourselves be seen.  This is what she means by daring greatly.

Why do we sit on the sidelines afraid to show who we are?

Our belief about who we are, and our willingness to live that out, impacts every aspect of our lives.

Daring greatly is not about winning or losing. It’s about courage.  Putting ourselves out there means there’s a far greater risk of feeling hurt.  But, daring greatly has meant that I had the courage to show up and let myself be seen.   -Brene Brown

Right on, Brene!

Share with the group antidotes you’ve used to address your fears, and how you might live your life wholeheartedly.

Resources
Shawn Achor – The Happiness Advantage
Brene Brown – Daring Greatly

Read For Life Twitter Book Giveaway!

What will you win? –A Free copy of this week's book.

How do you win?
1. Tweet about this episode using the Twitter share button.
2. Add the hashtag #readforlife
3. Add my Twitter Handle: @KThompsonSings
I will draw a winner from the tweets on the Monday after the episode publishes.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

  • Ruth R. Hartunian-Alumbaugh

    I wholeheartedly agree with you! When I give piano lessons, I tell them that a “small” mistake and a “big” mistake in performance or even in the lesson are still mistakes! So make it good! Make it big! Make it worthwhile. Play WHOLEHEARTEDLY.

    So, let’s LIVE wholeheartedly, too!

    • Our choir director used to say that too, Ruth. If you’re going to make a mistake, make it a big one. A similar idea, isn’t it?